Transformative Cyber Innovation Lab

About

Even with the power of our vast national resources, we still stand in an increasingly darkening shadow of a devastating, national-scale cyberattack that, by taking down even a part of our critical national infrastructure, will make our country as physically vulnerable as it has ever been. While the analysis of the threat and the adversary’s intentions and capabilities in the cyber domain must continue, we can no longer simply study the problem. What is needed is a cyber innovation lab dedicated to aggressively converting the urgent need faced by our society, our economy, and our defense establishment into transformative solutions for those vulnerabilities.

The Transformative Cyber Innovation Lab (TCIL or Lab) will find and nurture technologically feasible, testable pilot projects which begin to solve some of the hardest cyber problems afflicting the national security industrial base and our country. Our mission is to help shorten the lag between idea and piloting, and between piloting and adoption of potential solutions to the thorniest of cyber problems.

The mission of the Transformative Cyber Innovation Lab is to drive revolutionary, society-wide improvement in cyber resilience through the innovative synthesis of technology, policy, and governance. This entails:

  • assessing the evolving cyber vulnerabilities which exist in both the USG and the private sector;
  • identifying potential, late-stage, technological solutions to mitigate those vulnerabilities;
  • mitigating the “human” (e.g., legal/procedural/bureaucratic) hurdles that prevent adoption of the technology;
  • devising pilot projects to test the efficacy and applicability of the proposed solutions; and
  • socializing legal, policy, and technological solutions to the USG, private sector, and citizenry to encourage adoption and use.

Our work will assist those government agencies and private sector companies on the front-lines of the cyber battlespace.

The unique goal of TCIL is to drive specific policy and governance innovation. Specifically, TCIL will:

  • Accelerate transition of emergent technologies in national cybersecurity practice;
  • Construct a permanent platform for technology-driven policy innovation; and
  • Facilitate an interactive interface between funders and practitioners of cybersecurity.

We will measure success by evaluating if our pilot projects are adopted within the USG and the private sector. The pilot projects will include real-world tests with qualitative and quantitative analysis of the results.

Experts