June 5, 2024 | Hoover Institution

Why Is there no Palestinian State?

The conflict between Israel and the Palestinians is intractable. One binational state is impossible, given that the two sides – Jews and Arabs -- have irreconcilable national projects. The two-state scenario has also proven elusive with Palestinians refusing to recognize Jewish nationhood.
June 5, 2024 | Hoover Institution

Why Is there no Palestinian State?

The conflict between Israel and the Palestinians is intractable. One binational state is impossible, given that the two sides – Jews and Arabs -- have irreconcilable national projects. The two-state scenario has also proven elusive with Palestinians refusing to recognize Jewish nationhood.

Excerpt

The conflict between Israel and the Palestinians is intractable. One binational state is impossible, given that the two sides – Jews and Arabs — have irreconcilable national projects. The two-state scenario has also proven elusive with Palestinians refusing to recognize Jewish nationhood. Even if they did, Palestinians have not shown any capability of constructing and governing a state of their own – whether a democracy or an autocracy. As long as the prerequisites for peace remain unfulfilled, the status quo will persist: A Palestinian hodgepodge autonomy meshed with Israeli policing and occasional flare-ups of war.

The one-state solution, popularized among Arab-Americans by late Columbia professor Edward Said and endorsed today by protesters on U.S. college campuses, was tried as far back as 1920 when Britain assembled three Ottoman provinces into a state it called Palestine and designed it as a binational homeland for both Arabs and Jews.

Hussain Abdul-Hussain is a research fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies (FDD)

Issues:

Israel Palestinian Politics