January 25, 2021 | National Post

Even Democrats agree with much of Trump’s foreign policy legacy

It may be that after years of vitriolic debates and nasty rhetoric, Democrats and Republicans actually agreed on more than they were willing to admit
January 25, 2021 | National Post

Even Democrats agree with much of Trump’s foreign policy legacy

It may be that after years of vitriolic debates and nasty rhetoric, Democrats and Republicans actually agreed on more than they were willing to admit

Incoming secretary of state Anthony Blinken experienced his right of passage last Wednesday, when he was grilled by senators, both Democrats and Republicans, about how he intended to approach the job of America’s top diplomat. After years of political rancor and acrimony in Washington, one might have expected Blinken to hammer former U.S. president Donald Trump’s foreign policy at every turn. But he didn’t. In fact, on many issues, Blinken appeared to signal more continuity than change.

When asked whether he thought it was a bad idea for the Trump administration to cajole America’s NATO allies to spend more on defense, Blinken replied: “I do not.”

On the Trump administration’s targeted killing of Iranian arch-terrorist Qasem Soleimani in January 2020, Blinken said, “When I was last in office, I saw first-hand the blood that he had on his hands. So, no one regrets the fact that he is no longer there.”

Read in National Post

Issues:

Afghanistan Arab Politics China Gulf States Iran Iran Global Threat Network Iran Nuclear Israel North Korea Russia Sanctions and Illicit Finance Syria